HCPS Quick Links

Home

Home

 

Special Education Services

Homebound Instruction
Comprehensive Services Act for At-Risk Youth and Families
Educational Services at Detention Centers
School Social Work Services
Psychological Services



Comprehensive Services Act for At-Risk Youth and Families

Overview
The 1992 Virginia General Assembly approved legislation creating the Comprehensive Services Act For At-Risk Youth and Families (CSA). The Act restructured state funding and local service delivery systems in order to better meet the needs of families with children who have severe emotional and/or behavior problems. The CSA process took effect July 1, 1993.

 

A key feature of the Act is the emphasis on collaboration among the five major child-serving systems and the resulting coordination of services to families. The CSA requires that the social service, special education, mental health, public health, and juvenile justice systems work together to plan and provide services that are tailored to the individual needs of the child and his/her family.

 

State funds that were previously managed by the individual agencies are now allocated by formula directly to units of local government (cities and counties). The Act specifies the structure that local governments are to use in managing these funds and delivering services to the eligible population. Within this structure, communities have the flexibility to create policies, procedures, and services that are responsive to local needs.

 

Intent and Purpose
The intent of the Act is "to create a collaborative system of services and funding that is child-centered, family-focused, and community-based when addressing the strengths and needs of troubled and at-risk youth and their families." The purposes of the Act are to:

  • preserve and strengthen families;
  • provide appropriate services in the least restrictive environment while protecting the welfare of children and the safety of the public;
  • identify and intervene as early as possible;
  • create services to meet the needs of individual youths and their families;
  • increase family involvement and collaboration among agencies in planning and managing services;
  • encourage public and private partnerships in the delivery of services; and
  • provide greater flexibility and local control in the use of funds.

Eligible Population
In order to receive CSA funded services, a child must meet one or more of the following criteria for eligibility:

  • The child has emotional or behavioral problems which:
    • have persisted over a significant period of time or are of such a nature that intervention is warranted;
    • are significantly disabling and present in several community settings, such as home, school, community, or with peers; and
    • require services that are unavailable or inaccessible, that are beyond the normal agency services or routine collaborative processes between agencies, or that require coordinated services by at least two agencies.
  • The child has emotional and/or behavioral problems and is at risk of entering residential care.
  • The child requires placement for purposes of special education in a private school program.
  • The child has been entrusted or committed to the local social services agency.
  • The child is less than 18 years of age or is otherwise eligible for special education or foster care services through age 21.

Access to Services - Henrico County Referral Procedures
A referral for access to the CSA process must be made by one of the five public agencies that participate in the local collaborative planning and management structure. Those agencies include the Department of Social Services, Henrico County Public Schools, Juvenile Court Services, Henrico Area Mental Health & Retardation Services, and the Henrico County Health Department. As CSA is designed to supplement the normal array of publicly funded services in the community, this referral process mandates that at-risk youth and their families use all less restrictive levels of service before a referral for consideration in the CSA process is undertaken.

 

Henrico County Management Structure

Family Assessment and Planning Team (FAPT)
The Family Assessment and Planning Team is composed of personnel from each of the public child-serving agencies in Henrico County, the CSA Coordinator, and a parent representative. The FAPT meets twice weekly with eligible children and families to develop a plan for delivery of services and to monitor the effectiveness of those services. The FAPT holds the authority to obligate funds under the Comprehensive Services Act.

 

Henrico Policy and Management Team
The Henrico Policy and Management Team (HPMT) is appointed by the Board of Supervisors to make policy and funding decisions for this collaborative multiagency effort and to maximize the use of state and community resources in serving this high-risk population. The HPMT is chaired by a Deputy County Manager. Membership on the HPMT includes supervisory personnel from the following community agencies: community services board (mental health), juvenile court services, department of health, department of social services, and public schools. A representative from the private provider community and a parent representative are also appointed to the team.

For further information contact:

Carol P. Jellie
Henrico County CSA Coordinator
(804) 501-4027
email: JEL03@co.henrico.va.us

Nyah Hamlett
Director, Exceptional Education

804-652-3866
email: ndhamlett@henrico.k12.va.us

Virginia Office of Comprehensive Services
http://www.csa.state.va.us/index.htm

 

return to top

Educational Services at Detention Centers

Henrico County Juvenile Detention Center
The educational program at the Henrico County Juvenile Detention Center is supervised by the Department of Education and Henrico County Public Schools. It is the mission of the center to provide appropriate educational services to school age youth residing in the detention facility. Criteria for admission to, and release from the center, is the jurisdiction of the Henrico County Juvenile Courts. The instructional program for each detained youth is tailored to fit his/her individual needs within the confines of the detention facility. When a youth has been receiving special education services in his/her public school placement, and is admitted with an existing Individual Education Program (IEP), it is the responsibility of the educational personnel at the detention center to ensure the continued implementation of the IEP with modifications, as may be necessary, due to the nature of the youth’s detainment. Children without an IEP continue to receive educational services to meet their individual needs with a curriculum that follows as closely as possible to the student’s home school education program.

 

The educational staff assigned to the detention center continues the long standing practice of working closely with each student’s home school in an effort to assure a smooth educational transition into and out of the detention center setting.

 

P. O. Box 27032
Richmond, VA 23273
Phone Number – (804) 556-4214
Fax Number - (804) 556-2949

Barry G. Chlebnikow, Principal
bgchlebnikow@henrico.k12.va.us


James River Regional Juvenile Detention Center
The James River Regional Juvenile Detention Center is located in Powhatan County off of Route 522. James River serves three counties: Henrico Co., Goochland Co., and Powhatan Co. There are currently 60 beds available; 52 beds are designated for Henrico Co. youth, 4 beds are for Goochland Co. youth and 4 beds for Powhatan Co. youth. James River Detention is overseen by a commission consisting of five members with representation from each of the three participating counties. The educational program at the James River Regional Juvenile Detention Center is supervised by the Department of Education and Henrico County Public Schools. It is the mission of the center to provide appropriate educational services to school age youth residing in the detention facility. Criteria for admission to, and release from the detention center is the jurisdiction of the Henrico County Juvenile Courts, the Goochland County Juvenile Courts or the Powhatan Juvenile Courts. The instructional program for each detained youth is tailored to fit his/her individual needs within the confines of the detention facility. When a youth has been receiving special education services in his/her public school placement, and is admitted with an existing Individual Education Program (IEP), it is the responsibility of the educational personnel at the detention center to ensure the continued implementation of the IEP with modifications, as may be necessary, due to the nature of the youth’s detainment. Children without an IEP continue to receive educational services to meet their individual needs with a curriculum that follows as closely as possible to the student’s home school education program.

 

James River Detention also offers two additional programs within the educational setting. There is a Post-Dispositional Program and a program entitled ISAEP (Individual Student Assessment and Evaluation Program). The Post-Dispositional Program is for youth who are placed through the juvenile courts into the program, having met previously set criteria. The youth entering this program will be in the program from four to six months and participate in a variety of detention center groups along with their educational program.

 

Youth meeting set guidelines and who are either 16 or 17 years of age may opt to participate in ISAEP. The guidelines for entering this educational program are very specific and require a written contract with the youth and parent before entering the program. While in this program, youth will work on completing a GED and receive specific vocational counseling and training before being released from ISAEP. If a youth has begun the program and is released from the detention center before completion, it is expected that they will then enter the same program within their public school system.

The educational staff assigned to the detention center continues the long standing practice of working closely with each student’s home school in an effort to assure a smooth educational transition into and out of the detention center setting.

 

P.O. Box 880
Goochland, VA 23063
Phone Number – (804) 556-4214
Fax Number - (804) 556-2949

Barry G. Chlebnikow, Principal
bgchlebnikow@henrico.k12.va.us

return to top

 

School Social Work Services

School workers in Henrico are involved in a broad range of situations where social, familial, emotional, behavioral, economic, or cultural barriers interfere with students' ability to achieve their educational potential. Services may be preventive, remedial, or crisis-oriented and include assessment, consultation, intervention, and education.

 

As a member of Child Study and Eligibility Committees in each school, social workers evaluate students within their social environment and collaborate in the development of instructional and support strategies to meet identified student needs. Socio-cultural and adaptive behavior assessment are necessary components in the evaluation of students' needs for special education and/or support or intervention services.

 

School social workers provide unique services to students, families, and schools in order to help students attain maximum benefits from the school program. Services focus on uniting the efforts of home, school, and community on behalf of students. School social workers contribute to programs for students at risk because of disabling conditions, substance abuse, teen pregnancy and parenting, poverty and unemployment, emotional problems, suicidal behavior, poor attendance, or dropping out of school.

 

Services to Students and Parents

  • Assist families in understanding their children's educational needs and in taking advantage of appropriate school and community services.
  • Provide extensive outreach services, including home visits, to students and parents to help resolve school-related problems and conflicts.
  • Help students overcome barriers to regular school attendance. Dropout prevention and retrieval require early intervention strategies and linking students and their families with school and community resources
  • Serve as a primary school liaison between community agencies and other professionals serving students and their families.
  • Provide socio-cultural assessments of students being evaluated for special education services.
  • Conduct a variety of parent education activities geared to supporting and strengthening the school-parent relationship.
  • Provide ongoing case management for students and families in complex and multi-problem situations.

Teamwork with School Personnel

  • Serve on multidisciplinary Child Study and Eligibility meetings in all schools.
  • Consult with teachers to develop intervention strategies with individual students.
  • Collaborate with teachers, administrators, and other school personnel to provide effective instructional support services to marginally performing or high-risk students.
  • Contribute to the development and implementation of Individualized Education Programs (IEP's) for special education students, 504 plans for students with disabilities, and Student Education Plans for regular education students.
  • Assist administrators in the resolution of disciplinary problems.
  • Participate in causal hearings for special education students.
  • Serve on task forces and committees that develop programs and practices, particularly those affecting at-risk students.
  • Serve on school crisis teams.
  • Conduct a variety of in-service training activities on such topics as effective communication with parents, cultural difference in families, barriers to attendance, children who are withdrawn or disruptive, classroom management, and social skills training.
  • Perform observations of students for informal and formal assessments.
School-Community Relations
  • Participate as school representative in specialized community activities to help identify and develop resources for troubled students.
  • Maintain ongoing communication between schools and community agencies to promote positive working relationships between agencies (i.e., inter-agency staff meetings).
  • Provide case management for students requiring interagency collaboration through the Community Assessment Team (CAT).
  • Facilitate surrogate parent procedures for children in foster care.
  • Coordinate truancy with Police Department.
  • The department provides placement and supervision of graduate-level interns from the Virginia Commonwealth University School of Social Work.
Professional school social workers are dedicated to the disciplined use of a recognized body of knowledge for the practice of social work in the schools. In Virginia, the required academic degree for entry into school social work is the Master of Social Work from an accredited graduate school. Two years of graduate study and year-long internships are required for this degree, and further graduate courses in education are needed for certification to practice in public schools in Virginia.

 

Each year the Henrico School Social Work Department is used by Virginia Commonwealth University to place graduate M.S.W. candidates for their second year internships. Members of our department act as adjunct faculty by providing the field experiences and supervision required for state certification. For over 20 years, we have provided this supervision to over 80 master's level school social workers. This year the School Social Work Department is providing training and supervision for four VCU M.S.W. Candidates.

return to top



Psychological Services

School psychologists in Henrico County Public Schools help students, teachers and families work together to improve student learning in academic and social areas which are essential to long term career success and quality of life adjustment.

 

Services Provided

  • Consultation with parents/teachers/administrators to address barriers to learning
  • Psycho educational assessment of children from preschool through 12th grade
  • Prevention/intervention in areas such as bullying, suicide, anger management and self-esteem
  • Individual and group counseling
  • Teacher in-service and parent education training
  • Crisis intervention
  • Intern supervision

Parent/Teacher Resource

Staff Qualifications

  • Every school psychologist has an advanced graduate or doctoral degree which includes a one year supervised internship.

Our Staff Includes

  • Five doctoral level school psychologists
  • 1 Supervisor
  • Twenty-two full-time and one part-time school psychologists


TransportationSchool LocatorBoard DocsHCPS TVEmail SearchWebmailHCPS Link